Magic in the Midriff Islands.

Last summer I lead a trip for Bluewater to the Sea of Cortez. An incredible week aboard the Rocio del Mar liveaboard diving these unique and incredible waters. Here’s my trip report from this fantastic trip (adapted from what I wrote up for Bluewater’s website).

Welcome to the Sea of Cortez. Dubbed by Jacques Cousteau as the “World’s Aquarium” this living sea definitely lives up to the name. Abundant life swimming through warm waters provides a unique diving experience where temperate and tropical worlds collide. From the tiniest skeleton shrimp to the giant whale shark, the Sea of Cortez offers a variety of marine encounters and incredible diving.

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Thankful for Dive Buddies

I’m a few weeks late on this post, but I’m always thankful for my dive buddies. While I often end up diving solo on many local boats with my nose to my camera screen, it’s always fun to step back from those serious photography dives and just cruise around with a couple friends.

After Thanksgiving this year myself, my husband and a couple friends went out diving for the day on the Peace off Anacapa. We caught the tail end of this beautiful summer here in California (and yes I mean tail end of summer when we were diving on November 29th!!) We’ve been experiencing some crazy weather here in SoCal with extremely warm water temps which have unfortunately killed much of the kelp around the local islands, but also brought clear visibility, comfortable diving temps and unique sightings. This dive at the end of November hearalded the beginning of classic California season, as the water temp had dropped at least 10° from my dives a month prior and the viz was diminishing.

Regardless, I had two great dive buddies keeping me company underwater and posing as models (whether they realized it or not!) It was a blast to swim with friends and just enjoy a laid back day of diving!

Anilao Wide Open.

The beauty of Anilao is found in the diversity. When your eyes get tired of hunting for the minuscule among the sandy muck or hiding within the folds of a crinoid you can simply change lenses and open your eyes to the full scene. Lush coral reefs abound around the area offering colorful fish by the hundreds and incredibly scenes to try to capture. Here are a few of those scenes from my first trip to the Philippines back in 2013.

ID Insanity.

One of my favorite aspects of diving is looking up the fish and critters I photographed during the dive to learn what they are. While I’m not great at retaining the knowledge, especially with places I only visit infrequently (or just once), I enjoy knowing what I saw. I also try to log the names as keywords in Lightroom so I can reference them later.

Of course there are always those critters that don’t quite match the options available in my book and you start to wonder. Could it be? Maybe it’s? Hmm, I wonder….

Luckily for me, we live in a digital age, where I can upload a photo into google image search, add a keyword and bring up all the similar images floating around the interweb… mystery critter no longer!

This was the case for one of my nudibranch from the 2013 Anilao trip. In my book there were a few possibilities, but none of the photos matched. My nudi had white bumps when all of the pictures had orange or yellow bumps. Another species had major variation with either orange or white bumps, but I dismissed it because it still was not quite what I had seen. Turns out I was wrong. That last species was the winner, thanks to a google image search which brought up several matching nudis, more than one of which was labelled Phyllidia ocellata. While you can’t believe everything you read on the internet, I feel pretty confident that its a good ID. I guess I should have put more faith in the first two words on that entry in my Reef Creature Guide…. “Highly Variable”.

Hello Phyllidia ocellata.

Phyllidia ocellata

Phyllidia ocellata

Worlds Collide.

Worlds Collide.

The squid have come back to Los Angeles, with a huge squid run happening up and down the coast. Down at Veteran’s Park in Redondo Beach, thousands upon thousands of squid have been gathering to mate, lay eggs and die. Last night we ventured out to see them and I was amazed at how many squid were just swimming around down there. They couple up for the males to fertilze the females then eggs are laid in groups called baskets before the squid, life’s goal of procreating complete, simple die and become tasty food for all the other critters down there.

Long Time.

Hello dear readers! There are apparently some of you that haven’t given up hope in light of my silence over the last few months… there seems to be an average of a whopping 3 views per day with weird spikes like 112 views on Sunday, April 7th. Perhaps that was because I was supposed to dive, but it was cancelled for weather. Regardless, thanks to the faithful, I hope to earn your readership back as I plunge forward once more.

I apologize for the silence… its been a combination of things that have kept me from updating, namely Ironman training. What’s that you ask? Just a small little race of insanity that has completely overidden my life. (you can read all about my previous IM adventure here). Due to the IM training I’ve been in the water only a handful of times this year, and I’m surely missing it. We’re 10 weeks out from the race and things are ramping up. Work has been super busy as everyone starts gearing up for their summer holidays, however this little blog, and my joy of sharing my underwater photography activities has always been in the back of my mind. I have a little catch up to play, and I hope that I can get a few posts up here over these next 10 weeks, to revive this little site and keep sharing my favorites! Here’s a little sneak peek of what’s ahead…. so for now, hello! Goodbye! I promise it won’t be so long next time.

BB-Goby

This Blue Banded Goby was hanging out at Casino Point in Catalina. I used a Sola 800 Photo light with the red light on to be able to sneak up on him. Took this on a day I was out diving solo testing three new lenses for the store. It was a perfect day, with great visibility, calm conditions and lots of little fishes for my macro tests.

Stellar Visibility.

I have dived the Oil Rigs off the coast of Long Beach several times now. In fact it is one of my favorite dives. The three dimensional structure differs from any reef or kelp forest. Its a mix of a bluewater dive and wreck dive. There is no floor (at least not one that you can see within the recreational limits), and you can find all sorts of pelagic life that floats or swims through the rigs. The beams themselves are covered with soft corals, anenomes and a variety of macro life. Fish and Sea Lions call the rigs home, so there is never a shortage of awesome things to see.

Last weekend I dove the rigs again, and experienced probably the best rig dives I’ve ever had. The visibility was amazing, more than 60ft… could even have been up to 80ft. I saw one Mola Mola swim by outside the rigs, and near the surface we were completely surrounded by a giant school of small fish. Often the rigs are cleaned near the surface, sometimes all the way down to 50ft, but this was not the case here. The growth on the upper beams was less, but there was still growth. The weather was warm, the sun came out, and when one of my strobes died on the second dive I decided to take some video. With only 1 light, the color is not the best, but the OM-D takes great quality video and I was very pleased with how this turned out. Enjoy the glimpse of my latest great diving adventure!

Up from the Deep.

I went out blue water diving with some friends a couple weekends ago and while we were shunned by any of the big stuff… no molas or other large pelagic life, we did see lots and lots of jellies. Small and transparent most of these would be hard to photograph on a normal dive. Since this was a blue water dive we were tethered to a line dropped off the boat and just floating along with the current. Drifting as such means that I only get about 30 seconds to compose, focus and shoot any passing jelly before the float past and out of my reach. This makes the dive more exciting as I tried to get a good shot, or even just a shot in focus. This was my second time out, and I was a bit more successful.

Swimming with Sea Dogs.

Last month, yes that’s how far behind on my pictures I am… anyways. Last month we headed out to Santa Barbara Island to hang with some sea lions in the large rookery on the island. I’ve never had good luck photographing these swift swimmers, but this day I was armed with a wide angle lens and two strobes and the results were… well… better than before, but still with lots of room for improvement. We ended up shallow, spending a good deal of time in 6-15′ of water. I was using the 8mm fisheye, a lens that I love, though I quickly found out that with such a wide lens, the sea lions needed to get extremely close, which didn’t always happen. After the day of diving, and upon talking with others on the boat and looking at my pictures, I also realized that I really should have tried some shots with just the ambient light. The 1/160 shutter speed on my E-PL1 isn’t quite fast enough to really freeze the sealions as the zoomed by, and I was shallow enough much of the time that I could have turned off the strobes and bumped up the shutter speed. Ah…well, something for next time.