Hermit Hiding.

Throughout the fourth dive, Fish Bowl Point, there were a variety of Hermit Crabs out enjoying the warm water. I say warm, as it was nearly 60 degrees up at Anacapa which out here is rather warm! I was able to sneak up on this guy and snap a couple photos before he shrank into his shell, and for once, the shallow focus plane hit right where I wanted it to! His eye and little arms are nicely in focus and it almost seems like he’s watching me come close. Well, he probably was!

I’m headed up to Guerneville, CA this weekend (think Napa area) for some swimming, biking, running and wine tasting! I hope everyone in LA has a nice weekend and gets a chance to escape the “carmageddon” freeway closure. Hey…go diving!

Just out for a stroll.

Right at the beginning of the third dive, I came across this little Spanish Shawl crawling across the sand. Despite getting knocked side to side by the strong surge, he was actually managing to move at quite a good pace. I settled down on the sand right in front of him, trying to make him fill the frame, while also trying get the rhinophores (the red ear like parts) nicely in focus. Well, I seemed to be just off on all my shots, with these two being the best of the bunch. My macro lens creates such a shallow depth of focus that its hard to get right where I want it to be, especially with the surge I was battling. Other than the focus issues, I was really happy with the exposure and composition of these guys. I didn’t amputate any part of the nudi, I got him looking right at me and and even was able to incorporate the useful diagonal composition on the second picture to help include the whole nudibranch. It will just take more time and practice and soon I’ll have my macro shooting locked down much better! 🙂

Filling the Frame.

The second to last group of pictures from my photography adventure a couple weeks ago is of a tube anemone. I had my macro adapter with me and really wanted to work on some macro shots and practice with “filling the frame,” another one of Scott’s composition tips. I had a little trouble at first, not getting my camera to focus properly…that is until realizing I had messed with the settings on my camera and was not even in the mode I wanted to be. After taking a second to switch back into manual and check my exposure settings I tried again. This time everything worked right. After that I spent the next 15 minutes (at least!) huddled over this anemone trying to get a shot with it wide open, perfectly centered with its tendrils spreading out of the frame. Finally I got it…well its maybe not 100% in the center, but its pretty darn close!

I continued shooting, trying different angles, still working to fill the frame but also to see if a lower angle, or an off angle would create a more compelling image. I remembered the rules of trying to use the diagonal and ended up liking this next image…

What I really liked is how the inner tendrils of the anemone are more prevalent, carefully reaching up and out of the dark center. Once again, I had trouble not shifting any sandy bits as I knelt in the sand next to the small creature, but as a first time practice I’m okay with the small white spots of sand marring the dark center. If I really wanted to I’m sure I could take them out in photoshop, but I haven’t had the time.

After awhile I remembered I was underwater with a finite air supply, so I checked my gauges, surprised to find my air half gone and 30 minutes elapsed. Yikes! Looking around I also discovered that the rest of the group had moved on to other subjects, so I said goodbye to my anemone and swam up to shallower water in order to make the dive last a bit longer and to find another macro subject.