Surgealicious.

At the beginning of July I got the chance to finish an Advanced class with several students that I had began the class with a couple months ago. We were headed out on the Peace with two dives to complete, which meant I would also get two “fun dives” in. Excited for another chance to practice photography, I brought my camera to use on the dives once we were done with the AOW class. The day was great, though the visibility wasn’t fantastic in general. We hit up Cathedral Gardens and Rat Rock first, and I was a bit bummed at Rat Rock that I didn’t have the camera with me. When we hopped in and descended I looked for a patch of sand to start with the class and couldn’t find anything, the bottom seemed covered in thin weeds. However when we got closer I discovered that it was not weeds, but rather brittle stars! The entire bottom of the ocean in this area was thoroughly blanketed with massive amounts of brittle stars. It was incredible. Hopefully I’ll get to go back soon with camera in hand.

I was able to take the camera on dives 3 and 4 at Channels and Fish Bowl Point respectively. Since the visibility was limited, I decided to focus on macro which would keep me close to the subject and the poor viz wouldn’t matter so much. This would have been great except for one minor issue. SURGE. Most of my dive was spent in about 20ft of water, and the surge was intense. I found it extremely difficult to compose a shot with the macro lens on, a few inches from a subject and snap the shutter before I was tossed back and forth with the surge.

There were a ton of really beautifully colored anemones at the Channels dive site, and I wanted to practice shooting them as the lines and patterns they contain can make beautiful pictures. I didn’t have a ton of luck in capturing that great shot of a perfectly centered anemone with its tendrils fanning out along the edge, but I did capture several different colors and beautiful patterns of lines. Hopefully I’ll get to visit again with better viz and much less surge! Here’s the first of the next round of photo posts: Anemones!

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