Finally Farnsworth.

Its the dive site that everyone talks about… if you’re diving around Catalina, inevitably the question of, “so, have you dove Farnsworth?” will come up. It is a site I’ve yearned to get the chance to see, one of the only places I know around Southern California where you get hard corals…the famous Purple Hydrocoral. Truth to be told, its not actually even a true coral, its a hydroid, in the phylum Cnidaria – relative to jellyfish and anemones! Farnsworth Bank is a preserve for this slow growing animal, and its easy to see that it flourishes out there.

The Bank is found a little ways off shore from the backside of Catalina. It’s a large seamount that rises off the ocean floor (which is anywhere from 300-100 feet deep) up to about 50ft below the surface. There are several walls where it just drops away, as well as many gentler sloping faces. Over all the site is larger than can be fully explored in one trip…especially when I happen to have my camera and could easily spend all day within a few yards around the anchor chain!

I buddy-ed up with fellow photographer Carolyn, and while we are not the best of buddies in terms of sticking close and keeping in contact with each other, it worked out well as we were both not up for wandering super far, and wanted to practice our photo skills. We descended along the anchor chain looking down into the blue depths of some of the clearest water I’ve seen out here in California. Surprisingly though, as we reached about 30ft it started to get dark, as though we were approaching the seamount already. This was way to early and I quickly discovered that it was not land, but rather a huge and thick school of Blacksmith blocking our view. Slowly we descended below them and the view of Farnsworth began to form in the dark water below us.

This dive is different from so many around Southern California, as there is very little kelp. The makeup of the site is rocky, covered with anemones, very few urchin and just littered with the little clumps of Purple Hydrocoral. Lingcod, Garibaldi, Sheephead and the thick schools of Blacksmith surround the area. Eels and octopus can be found tucked away between the rocks, and of course my favorite, the little colorful nudibranchs seem to be everywhere!I spent the first dive slowly exploring and taking in the view. I found a huge (nearly 4 inches) lemon dorid nudibranch, as well as an awesome little hermissenda nudi perched nicely on a barnacle. Later, nestled beautifully in a grove of hyrdocoral was a large moray, just curiously poking out his head at me.

On the second dive I followed a large lingcod for a bit as he swam away then settled again, then practiced more with my landscape shots, attempting to expose the background and use my strobe to help light the darkened foreground correctly.

While I might not have wandered too far and really explored the area. I enjoyed two fantastic dives practicing my photography…finally getting a chance to try some wider landscape shots because of the better visibility. All too soon it was time to swim back up through the thick cloud of fish and back to the boat. I’ve definitely been bitten by the Farny bug, and look forward to getting to explore more of the site next time.

Finishing off the day, we motored around to the front side of the island and enjoyed a relaxing shallow dive off Eagle’s Nest. The visibility here was not a great as the first two dives, but it was still enjoyable and relaxing.

Sunscreen.

Yesterday I went diving, it was a beautiful sunny day, nice and warm as well. I am usually pretty good about remembering to apply sunscreen, as I’ve had sun/skin problems in the past and I don’t want them to come back, so avoiding sunburns and excess exposure is very important to me. However, sometimes things slip by. For example… when the warm sun allows you to unzip your chest zip wetsuit and pull the constricting hood/neck portion off. This leaves a thin piece of neoprene around your neck and over your back and shoulders. However, did you know that it doesn’t quite cover all the way down to where the hood is flopped over your back? Its true. Which means, that you’re going to end up with this:


Two lovely little triangles where my skin was not covered by my vest or my wetsuit. Oops.

PS. More on our wonderful day of Farsnworth hopefully later… need to finish up going through pictures and clean the apartment before I sit down and delve into it or I won’t get any chores done today!

It Came Back.

You all remember about two months ago, when I posted the sad sad loss of my old Aqualung mask, after a fateful attempt at beach diving on a day that we should have just gone and gotten a tea. Well, against all odds (or maybe not since Vet’s is a popular site frequented by many divers) it came back.

I just so happened to be relaxed at a friends house watching an episode of Dexter when I randomly checked my email and saw a friend had posted on my wall asking about my missing mask. The post went something like… Hey, did you lose a mask, because we found one tonight at Vets, aqualung with the initial KED on the side…blue eco strap…and so forth. Immediately I shouted for joy, (no joke…ask someone who was there…) and replied that it sounded like it was indeed mine!

So, long story short… I got my mask back. We were reunited last week at an Eco meeting, and all is now right in the world. Of course, I’ve already purchased a new mask… and honestly the Mares Liquid Skin mask fits nicely, and the silicone skirt is so light and soft it feels like there is hardly anything on my face. I won’t be returning the old faithful Aqualung to service; it now will sit deservedly on my shelf, a reminder of the good ‘ol days (along with my old BCD, computer and reg).

Why did I care so much about this mask? Well simply because it was a gift. My Uncle Doug really helped me with my goal of getting more diving under my belt back in 2006 when I was accepted into an internship with Dolphin Dreams Images in Hawaii. He purchased the above mentioned BCD, gave me his regulators and computer for the trip, bought me fins, booties and a snorkel and gifted me that old mask of his. It always fit great, and while not necessarily the most stylish, got the job done. Since suffering a hip injury which kept him out of the water, and because I had been diving more and more out here in California he let me keep the regs. I’ve now retired the BCD, replaced the computer and the regulator, and fins, leaving just the mask, his old gauges and octo as a reminder of his contribution to my diving lifestyle. Soon I will replace the gauges and one day the octopus, but I’ll now always have the mask as a little reminder of him. Perhaps one day his hip will be better and he’ll join me in the kelp forest. :o)

So thanks to the anonymous diver who recovered and left my mask hanging at the showers, thanks to Amanda for recognizing the Eco strap and picking it up!

Peering at the Palawan.

I know, I know. Its been forever since I’ve graced you with my presence and recounted the latest and greatest dive adventure. Honestly its because there haven’t been too many lately. Sad right? However its not for lack of underwater time, I’ve just been passing along my knowledge teaching in the pool and ocean this year…but more on that later. In addition, my goal for this year is to find a balance between my two passions, Scuba and triathlon, two hobbies which do not mesh well, especially since both want to take up the bulk of any weekend…but again, more on that later.

Last night, I hooked up with a group of dive buddies for the rare mid-week boat dive. The plan was the wreck of the Palawan, which lies off the coast of Redondo. The Palawan is a 440′ Liberty Ship that was sunk in the 1970’s as an artificial reef. It lies in about 110′ – 130′ of water, so with my single tank of air it made for a couple of short dives. Since the ship has been down there going on 30 years its somewhat degraded, with mostly just the hull remaining and has a ton of life and growth surrounding it.

We left Redondo on the Island Diver, and the short… 15 minutes!… motor to the site was easy and calm. This is diving at its most basic, we had rigged up and loaded our gear on the boat, suited up on shore and were chilling with some water and a bag of peanuts for snacks. Simple and perfect. That is until a wayward bit of peanut shell (or so i believe… you know, not the hard outside the but the papery like inner-shell…) caught the eddying winds and made a beeline for my eye. As the boat was dropping the buoy and setting anchor, I was doubled over with scratching pain in my eye, trying to figure out what happened! Shane and Saif assisted in trying to see if it was still in there, and Dan came to the rescue with his first aid kit and some saline solution. I never saw what truly flew into my eye, but I must have managed to get it out, because by the time the anchor was set and we were to go my eye was at a manageable level of distress… I figured I would try to descend and if it bothered me, then I’d call it. Luckily, I had no issues once in the water, and continued the descent down the rope into the black abyss.

Our first dive started out with a shock for two of our members as they approached the wreck and peered in the first hole only to have a large sea lion barrel out of it. It cruised around then disappeared into the darkness in an instant. All in all this dive was fantastic. I barely got to take in the wreck, as I worried about not finding the buoy line again, so buddy Saif and myself explored a small area around where the buoy lay. With the short no-deco time available at 110′ this was more than fine, and I was able to peer into some holes, and snap a few pictures of some of the many fish lounging about. The wreck is covered in strawberry anemones, red gorgonians, and plays home to a variety of fish, nudibranchs, sea stars, crab, lobster and a ton more I didn’t see I’m sure! I recently rigged my little Tusa as a focus light which allowed my camera to actually focus (finally!),  and I enjoyed the few minutes of bottom time seeking out fish and playing around with my new strobe… still trying to get the hang of it!! From there it was a long slow ascent up the rope, avoiding the few jellyfish floating nearby.

After a good surface interval, we splashed back into the water and descended back into the deep once more. This dive was even shorter, and its amazing how quickly time flies! I found a large rock crab, posing nicely and tried to get some shots of the wreck structure, but before I knew it my watch was reading one minute left!! A quick swim to the rope and it was back and up again. The ascent this time was a bit more harried, as around 20ft I glanced up to make sure all was stil clear and looked right into a huge jellyfish that was tangled around the rope! Of course the first reaction, is “OH SHIT” which also includes a sharp inhale… with full lungs I was now floating right into it, so I exhaled and purged the remaining air, dropping away from the rope, but not quite in time. One of the tentacles just barely grazed my cheek… no big deal really, a little stinging and some irritation but that was it.

After the dive, it was a short trip back to shore, quick break down and pack up before we headed over to Henessey’s for a late night snack. The dives were short but sweet, and Dick, our captain, was great. They visit the Palawan so frequently that he has the coordinates written on the boat window, and dropped the buoy line within 2 feet of the wreck, making our dives that much more enjoyable! I can’t wait for the next one!